Mexican state of Tlaxcala bans reparative therapy

Mexican state of Tlaxcala bans reparative therapy

Excellent news from Mexico in terms of LGBT+ rights

The State of Tlaxcala is the sixth State in Mexico to ban gay conversion therapy on minors by law. A very important victory for the Mexican and international LGBT+ movement. Not only that, Tlaxcala – according to equaldex.com – is an LGBT Friendly State, homosexuality is not illegal while egalitarian marriage has been approved, and gays can be part of the armed forces and donate blood. And now the abolition of these practices.

Reparative practices have the main purpose of changing sexual orientation from gay, lesbian, or bisexual to heterosexual, considering homosexuality a disease that can be ‘cured’ with certain procedures.

Obviously, these practices have no scientific basis, because homosexuality has never been a disease, although unfortunately the opposite was thought for a long time. And it was only recently that it was removed from the list of mental illnesses at the World Health Organization (1990) but despite this scientific decision, right-wing homophobic groups and religious extremists continue to support and promote their hatred and conversion practices based on the theories of Joseph Nicolosi – who died in 2017 – an American psychologist and promoter of these practices, as well as being a co-founder of NARTH (The National Association for Research & Therapy of Homosexuality).

What do these practices consist of? Here is what is reported by the site osservatoriodiritti.it

The techniques used are the most diverse: psychotherapy, administration of drugs, electroshock, exorcism, behavioural conditioning, isolation, food deprivation, verbal abuse and humiliation, hypnosis, beatings, and other so-called ‘corrective’ violence, including rape.

Many countries are banning these practices such as Germany, Brazil, Taiwan, Malta, Ecuador, and parts of Canada, Spain, the United States of America, Australia, and Mexico. In Italy, however, there is still no law prohibiting the practice. A delay that can no longer be tolerated.

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